Best Practices for Dealing with Workplace Violence

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Workplace violence is one of the most serious issues facing the American workforce. Workplace violence manifests itself in a multitude of ways. Threatening to carry out or carrying out an act of physical violence, intimidating, harassing or disrupting the activities of colleagues at the workplace come under the definition of workplace violence.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that up to two million Americans get affected by violence at the workplace, an alarming piece of statistics for one of the world’s most highly developed nations, in which the workplace is central to most peoples’ lives.

Mixed picture of workplace violence statistics

Since general awareness about workplace violence went on the ascendant in the 1980’s, there has been a remarkable dip in the incidence of workplace homicide, which is surely the most serious form of workplace. Killing a colleague over a difference at work is certainly the most barbaric form of workplace violence.

OSHA put the number of workplace homicide for 2014 at just over 400, which, although is a figure that has been steadily falling over the years; is not negligible. The bad news, however, is that other forms of workplace violence, such as intimidation, discrimination, bullying, hostility, and harassment, have been steadily rising over these few years.

Workplace violence is not taken seriously enough by employers

The tragedy about workplace violence is that a majority of the cases go unreported. As much as 60% of crimes committed against women at the workplace didn’t get to the enforcement agencies in the form of complaints between 1993 and 1999.

What is of equal worry is that nearly half of corporate executives don’t consider workplace violence as being serious enough to warrant intervention. Two thirds of American executives do not believe that workplace violence will create a negative impact on their budgets.

Many organizations are far behind in taking measures aimed at tackling workplace violence. Organizations need to identify the factors that precipitate and trigger workplace violence. Some of the most common factors that are directly linked to workplace violence include:

  • Confrontational behavior of a few employees
  • Exchange of money, which could lead to bitterness that could turn into violence
  • Serving alcohol in the office premises
  • Targeting people who work in lonely or remote locations at odd hours
  • Women at the workplace, who are vulnerable to becoming targets of workplace violence

Completely outmoded laws

A major problem facing the American workplace today is that most laws and methods of dealing with workplace violence are pretty outdated. Many organizations continue to be governed by rules that were made when workplaces were vastly different from those that we see today. The workplace before the advent of the New Economy was far different. Cybercrime, for instance, was unborn a few decades ago. Another of the outlets for initiating workplace violence, the social media, was also not born at the time of formulation of many of the laws that govern many organizations. Yet, the laws and rules on workplace violence have failed to keep pace.

Complete learning on dealing with workplace violence

So, how do organizations deal with workplace violence in the current scenario? All these aspects of how they can do it will be the learning a highly valuable, yet entertaining webinar from TrainHR, a leading provider of professional trainings for the healthcare industry, will be offering.

This webinar will have Dr. Gerard Lewis, an international consultant and trainer, who has worked with national and international government agencies, healthcare facilities, educational institutions and private businesses on a wide range of work, behavioral health and organizational issues; as speaker.

In order to gain full understanding of the area of workplace violence and to get an understanding of the ways of dealing with it, please register for this webinar by visiting TrainHR

Viewing this webinar, its entirety qualifies for a recertification credit hour that may be counted toward SHRM-CP and SHRM-SCP recertification from SHRM.
Credit is awarded based on the actual educational time spent in the program. This webinar has been approved for 1.5 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

Updating policies to stay current

Dr. Lewis will show how organizations can stay current with their policies and protocols to include workplace violence as a major part of the agenda. He will offer a comprehensive overview of best practices for organizational hostility mitigation and the role of HR.

Participants will be able to understand best practices for responding to workplace hostility, be able to provide policies, procedures and programs to their client-organizations, know the current changes in statistics as well as terminology relative to this ongoing issue, and understand how and when to provide psychological interventions around workplace hostility incidents.

The following areas will be covered at this webinar:

  • A brief overview of statistical trends
  • Updated definitions of violence, hostility, bullying, weapons, harassment, etc.
  • Sample policies for Workplace Hostility Mitigation Policy
  • Strategies to handle restraining/protective orders
  • An understanding of how to provide psychological interventions around a workplace hostility incident
  • Identifying the “at risk” employee and how to intervene
  • When to get a fitness for duty evaluation, what to expect from the evaluation and the role of the HR
  • Case examples.

 

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Understanding the Relationship Between Statistics and Compensation

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Isn’t pay essentially about statistics, since pay programs are designed and administered around math, which is central to pay, right from the structure to the analysis of data?

Statistics has a vital role to play in compensation. Statistics professionals and practitioners have to possess the nous needed for devising and analyzing concepts relating to pay, such as pay ranges, pay survey data, individual and group pay rates, and other elements of a compensation program.

A learning session that helps understand the relationship between statistics and compensation

David J. Wudyka, SPHR, Managing Principal of Westminster Associates in Wrentham, MA, who is an independent Human Resource Consultant with over 30 years’ experience in the profession, and is one of the first people in the United States certified in the Compensation field by the World At Work; will explain the role of statistics in compensation at a webinar that is being organized by TrainHR, a leading provider of professional trainings for the human resources industry.

Want to understand the nuances of the relationship between statistics and compensation? Then, all that you need to do is log on to TrainHR to enroll for this webinar.

Viewing this webinar, its entirety qualifies for a recertification credit hour that may be counted toward SHRM-CP and SHRM-SCP recertification from SHRM.
Credit is awarded based on the actual educational time spent in the program.

This webinar has been approved for 1.5 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

Pay structure unraveled

At this session, the speaker will simplify and demystify the assumed complexities of the pay structure. In unraveling the mysteries of statistics in compensation, David will help participants understand the various elements of the statistics behind the pay structure. He will ask and answer many questions relating to statistics in pay structure. Some of these include:

  • How to calculate minimums and maximums of a pay range, knowing just the new midpoints?
  • What is a compa-ratio, and how is it used?
  • How does one calculate a percentile, and how are percentiles used?
  • Why are weighted averages used by the majority of Compensation practitioners, and not the median?
  • What is the difference between simple regression analysis and multiple regression analysis, and how do practitioners use these concepts in a practical way?
  • What is correlation analysis and how does this analysis help in pay program administration?
  • When you are creating new pay structures, how can you estimate the number of grade levels between new midpoints using selected midpoint to midpoint spread percentages?
  • Why do practitioners divide pay ranges into quartiles?

Understanding of all the measures that go into pay programs

Knowledge of statistical concepts such as these is a great means improve one’s ability to create and analyze one’s compensation program. At this webinar, David will help identify the measures that Compensation professionals use when they design and administer pay programs, from the creation of pay structures through the analysis of pay survey data. This session will offer clear understanding the underlying statistics of the elements of compensation programs.

It will cover the following areas during this session:

  • How to create and analyze pay range widths (“spreads”)
  • Why “weighted averages” are more widely used than “medians”
  • Defining “means”, “medians” and “modes” (and how to use them)
  • How to understand the statistics of pay structure design
  • Understanding the difference between regression and correlation analysis, and how to apply them effectively in pay program analysis
  • How “percentiles” differ from “percents”, and how to calculate them
  • How to calculate rate range minimums and maximums from estimated midpoints
  • Calculating the “penetration” of pay rates in pay ranges
  • The Compa-ratio: what it is, how to calculate it and how to used it
  • Why pay ranges are divided into “quartiles”
  • The difference between “linear regression” and “multiple regression”
  • How to estimate the number of grade levels between two new pay structure midpoints
  • What are “measures of central tendency” and why are they important for analysis?

 

Employment issues

Since a company’s HR deals with recruitment and all the matters affecting employees day in and day out; it is natural for it to come across a host of employment issues. Each organization’s HR has its own unique issues, and it is difficult to point the finger at the most pressing or most urgent of employment issues.

So, when dealing with a broad and general topic such as employment issues; we would have to make a list which is more of a provisional one! As we just saw, employment issues are vast and innumerable and severely prone to change. Roughly, these could be considered to be among the important employment issues for an organization:

Finding and nurturing leadership: a major survey undertaken by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) in 2012, entitled Challenges Facing HR Over the Next 10 Years, rated this as the most important among employment issues for HR. This comes as absolutely no surprise, considering that the most important element of a business is the leadership that runs it. The organization that has the best leaders is surely going to be the best from the rest. The cream of a successful organization is its leaders. Finding the right leadership is the most important task for HR. is it any surprise that leadership is the most important of employment issues for HR?

Building organizational culture: this ranks second among employment issues for HR. Once leadership is in place; the most important task for HR is to build a reputation for the organization. Leaders build the organization’s reputation, and this is what the world will recognize the organization for.

Building and ensuring communication: one of the primary tasks for HR is to communicate. It has to make sure that all important communication is sent out to employees, management and everyone that matters. Interpersonal skills play an important role in communication. HR rates this as another of the employment issues.

Accountability: it is easy to understand why this is among the critical employment issues for HR. No work, including that done by HR, is worth its salt if it is carried out without accountability, as it points to arbitrariness and highhandedness. The task for HR is to ensure that there is accountability at every stage and every level.

Rewarding appropriately: rewards are at the core of an organization’s ability to recognize and keep good employees. HR plays a central role in instituting an effective rewards program. There is no doubting this quality as being among the major employment issues for HR.

Reference:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/meghanbiro/2012/11/11/5-greatest-challenges-ahead-for-hr-and-leaders/

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