Human Resources Training

Piercings, Tattoos and More: Dress Codes For the Workplace – Legally Compliant Policies and Guidelines

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The dress code is an area in which an organization’s HR faces many questions. It will have to deal with posers relating to dressing by employees, such as: is only formal dressing allowed at the workplace? Is semiformal dressing also allowed? Do different positions have different dress codes? Finally, with the advent of the Millennials at the workforce, what policy does the organization have vis-à-vis tattoos and piercings for its employees?

The only way to address these and related issues is for the organization to be clear about these aspects. It should formulate guidelines for a formal dress code in a written form and publish it with the employees, as well as with the management. It is only when there is lack of clarity on these matters that the chances of creating unnecessary rifts and arguments are aborted. A written workplace dress code is also a strong line of defense for organizations if employees decide to take the legal route over this issue.

The ways by which to get a proper grasp of all the aspects of a legally compliant dress code, which will go a long way in avoiding unpleasantness between the employees and the management, will be explained at a webinar that TrainHR, a leading provider of professional training for the human resources areas, is organizing.

At this webinar, which will be on October 24, Susan Strauss, a national and international speaker, trainer, consultant and a recognized expert on workplace and school harassment and bullying, will be the expert. Please visit TrainHR to enroll for this webinar.

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Dr. Strauss will explain why a dress code needs to be put in place in a workplace and what benefits it offers. A dress code should reflect the organization’s culture and should show it in a positive light. It should put the employees at ease, and should also be appropriate for each generation that it is created for.

How to deal with matters that the present generations of the workforce consider important, such as tattoos, makeup for women, jewelry, grooming and religious symbols, will be addressed. At this webinar, Dr. Strauss will cover the following areas:

  • Reasons to have a Dress Code
  • Your rights as an employer to establish a dress code as a condition of employment
  • What to include in your dress code?
  • Defining business, business casual and casual
  • Professionalism: customer contact positions
  • Morale and respect among coworkers
  • Safety: office and manufacturing positions
  • Uniforms and logo wear
  • Piercings, tattoos and hair
  • Perfume and cologne
  • Hygiene
  • Cultural and religious considerations and other exceptions
  • Younger generation’s preference for informality
  • When companies have been taken to court about “dress”: discrimination cases related to sex or gender, religion, or race?
  • When does dress make a positive or negative impact on performance?
  • Designing a policy which corresponds to your business.

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About the expert: Dr. Susan Strauss conducts harassment and bullying investigations and functions as an expert witness in harassment and bullying lawsuits. The popularity of these exercises can be gauged from the vast spectrum of sectors that her clients hail from: business, education, healthcare, law, and government organizations from both the public and private sector.

She has conducted research, written over 30 books, book chapters, and journal articles on harassment, bullying, and related topics. She appears on television and radio programs and is frequently interviewed for newspaper and journal articles.

 

 

 

 

 

employment law, HR compliance, Human Resources Training

Wage and Hour Topics: Making Sense of Requirements Affecting Exempt and Non-Exempt Employees

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For a financial supervisor, the knowledge of the relevant pay practices and applying the right one required for the type of employees she oversees is critical, no matter for how long the supervisor has been managing employees. The most fundamental knowledge needed is of the two basic pay employee status types under federal and state laws:

  • The exempt, and the
  • Non-exempt.

To many, it may seem as if some basic idea of these two types is enough. But there is a lot more to the employee pay statuses than these. One needs to be familiar with the fact that one type is paid a salary and the other, an hourly rate. This is just one of the several aspects and intricacies of what is broadly classified under “Wage and Hour.”

A learning session from TrainHR, a leading provider of professional training for the human resources arena, will help participants explore Wage and Hour topics in-depth. It will offer a clear understanding of several differing factors under the broader subject commonly referred to as “Wage and Hour.”

Melveen Stevenson, CEO and founder of M.S. Elemental, LLC, a human resources and business advisory firm based in Los Angeles, California, will offer valuable insights into this area of Wage and Hour practices. Please visit http://bit.ly/2Y0TMmy to enroll for this course.

This webinar has been approved for 1.5 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

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On the surface, handling pay practices may appear simple, but diligence is needed when it comes to classifying exempt and non-exempt employees properly. Businesses have to be acutely aware of the proper way of applying the appropriate federal and State Wage and Hour requirements. Acts such as misclassifying employees’ status, improperly paying employees, incurring penalties and fines, or making recordkeeping mistakes can invite major risks for non-compliance and the resultant penal actions.

The aim of this course is to give the participants a practical overview of the requirements along with strategies for implementing policies and procedures for Wage and Hour compliance. Melveen will examine the more common exemptions that apply to executive, administrative, and professional employees.

She will explain what differences lie between an employee and independent contractor, something that is of high importance in what is called the present-day “gig” economy, where the emphasis in many industries is on contract or ad-hoc hiring.

Being a practical one, this course will open the participants’ minds to the more common mistakes that employers make in attempting to comply with Wage and Hour requirements. The speaker will offer a review of some of the best practices that help companies be compliant.

At this 90-minute session, Melveen will cover the following areas:

  • Source of federal law for wage and hour requirements
  • Exempt and non-exempt classifications
  • Exemptions that apply to executive, administrative, and professional employees
  • Employee versus independent contractor
  • State meal and rest break requirements
  • Recordkeeping best practices for wage and hour requirements compliance.

This course is designed for the benefit of professionals that handle Wage and Hour issues, such as business owners, leaders, and managers who currently have employees, will be hiring employees, or are considering hiring an Independent Contractor. The target group also includes current leaders who have to manage either Exempt or Non-Exempt employees, and Executives, Vice Presidents, Directors, Managers, and Supervisors.

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About the speaker:

A certified HR professional with a background in accounting and finance, Melveen helps companies to navigate the human resources “jungle” of compliance, human capital, and leadership challenges. Melveen has held leadership positions in human resources operations, supply chain, and talent management at international companies in food manufacturing, medical devices, and consumer products. She has also worked internationally.