Stay Interviews Help to Retain Employees

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A stay interview is a potent tool for gauging employee moods and attitudes towards her work and the organization. It helps to understand employee thinking about her role and future in the organization. It is a powerful pointer to what an employee is planning to do in the near future in relation to her continuance or otherwise in the organization.

A stay interview is different from a joining interview, at which the employee is assessed for her suitability to the role and the organization. It is also different from an exit interview, at which the organization would like to know the reasons for which the employee has decided to quit the organization.  A stay interview comes somewhere between these two types of interviews.

A stay interview is done to assess the likeliness of the employee’s continuance or otherwise midway through her tenure. This kind of interview is needed because the employee may not have quit yet, but the HR and management determine that there is something about her behavior that suggests that she is likely to take this step in the near future.

Some of the reasons for which managements gets this feeling include:

  • The employee’s unhappiness at not being made part of a project that she has expressed her willingness to work in
  • Expressing lack of satisfaction with an appraisal
  • Open or tacit disagreement with her reporting manager or other colleagues
  • Showing signs that turbulence in her personal life is spilling over to work.

Stay interviews are also conducted during generalized situations. These may not be related directly to the specific employee, but could be triggered by events that have a direct bearing on the likeliness or otherwise of the employee’s continuance:

  • When the company is looking to retain core employees during an acquisition, takeover or merger
  • In times of general economic downturn or slowdown.

A stay interview is useful when the organization has to deal with employees who may be termed as fence sitters at a point of time. It helps the HR and the management to decide whether they have a stayer or a quitter on their hands. When done at the right time, stay interviews are more effective than exit interviews, because by the time an exit interview is carried out; the employee’s mind is almost certainly made up.

Stay interviews help to gauge the employee’s mind

Stay interviews are of immense help in serving the purpose of helping organizations keep its employees. It is all the more important for organizations to develop and utilize tools such as this, considering that a fourth of all employees are likely to quit their organizations over the next 12 months, according to a recent Harvard Business Review article.

A stay interview helps correct this to a large extent. A stay interview helps HR and the management to understand the mind of the employee and the plans she has for the near future. So, this one-on-one session becomes crucial. At this session, the managers have to ask the right questions to read the employee’s mind.

The intention of stay interviews is to get insights into what the employee is thinking at that point of time about whether to continue or not in the organization. For this reason, the stay interview should be pointed, specific and clear. The approach to stay interviews is that they should be well structured, specific and clear.

Benefits of stay interviews

Stay interviews carry many benefits. First of all, their very initiation fills the employees with a strong sense of motivation, because the feeling that management is thinking of them and wants to understand their decision gives a high feeling.

Stay interviews are also personalized and specific to the employee in question, where attention is paid to the individual employee. This is an opportunity to discuss matters of importance freely and without inhibitions.

Another important benefit of stay interviews is that they are likely to lead to actions from management in an inexpensive manner.

A training session on understanding the idea of stay interviews

When conducted properly, stay interviews are a very effective tool for retaining employees. The ways of doing this right will be imparted at a webinar on this topic that is being organized by TrainHR, a leading provider of professional trainings for the human resources industry. Marcia Zidle, CEO of Leaders At All Levels and a board certified executive coach, who is the speaker at this webinar, will give an understanding of all the important aspects of stay interviews.

This webinar has been approved for 1 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

The following areas will be covered at this webinar:

  • Identify five key factors that impact an employee’s desire to stay or leave
  • Recognize four possible “triggers” that cause the employee to consider leaving
  • Learn how to ask probing questions and conduct effective, efficient stay interviews
  • Survey a list of eight retention actions to increase employee’s loyalty and commitment
  • Review a sample of stay interview questions and develop your own customized list to ask
  • Discover how to develop stay plans for your employees and manage accountability
  • Develop a simple “how-to-toolkit” that includes who to select, how and when to approach, interview formant and how to handle possible resistance.

 

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Are you a leader or a manager?

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The debate about the differences between leadership and managerial ability is perhaps as old as the time these two qualities came to be identified. There is a lot of discussion about what leadership and management are, which of these is more suited for organizations, whether one of these is born and the other made, and so on.

Managers carry out the task assigned to them in an efficient, methodical manner. They go by the set processes and rules. A leader, on the other hand, leads by example. She is an intuitive person who thinks of out-of-the-box solutions to problems. She is rarely bound by the rules and lessons offered in management books.

This quote by Stephen Covey: “Effective leadership is putting first things first. Effective management is discipline, carrying it out”, sums up the difference between leadership and managerial abilities succinctly.

Further, few quotes about leadership and management perhaps give added perspectives on the differences between leadership and management:

  • You manage things; you lead people – Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper
  • People ask the difference between a leader and a boss. The leader leads, and the boss drives – Theodore Roosevelt
  • Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things – Peter Drucker
  • Management is efficiency in climbing the ladder of success; leadership determines whether the ladder is leaning against the right wall – Stephen R. Covey.

Despite the differences, an organization needs both

The differences between management and leadership are more pronounced when it comes to taking crucial decisions. A leader uses her intuition and takes decisions that are in the best interests of the organization and the people who get affected by the decision-making. A manager is important for carrying out the leader’s vision. In this sense, it is said that the role of the leader is strategic, while that of the manager is tactical.

Despite the numerous differences between the two qualities, both leadership and management are necessary and important for an organization. An organization needs both leadership and management if it has to carve out its path to success and progress. For the organization to be successful, both leadership and management have to collaborate and synergize. This blend is particularly useful in today’s global organizations, where the challenges are more varied and complex. There is a lot that is interesting to learn about the nature of the relationship and differences between leadership and management.

Lively learning session on leadership vs. management

So, for any organization, the point at which management and leadership converge and the extent to which they do so is very important. This is the topic of an interesting learning session from TrainHR, a highly popular provider of professional trainings for the human resources industry. At this webinar, Valerie Pelan, President of Integrated Focus, who provides her corporate clients with a strategic and global perspective that combines her business experience working in Fortune 100 companies and her experience as an entrepreneur, will be the speaker.

This session will take up the topic of leadership vs. management in depth. Valerie will explore the topic as it relates to organizations. To enroll for this highly absorbing session on leadership and management, please visit http://www.trainhr.com/control/w_product/~product_id=701696?wordpress-seo . This webinar has been approved for 1 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

Questions for judging leadership vs. management skills

At this session, Valerie will take up for discussion all the specific topics that enhance leaders and managers style, such as the following:

  • How consistent are you in your actions and decision-making processes?
  • What level of credibility do you hold in the context of your role?
  • How well do you use effective communication to build confidence and reassurance within your team?
  • People are attracted to leaders who “walk the talk”-are you that type of leader or manager?

This session is highly useful for professionals such as Managers, Leaders, HR Managers and Hiring Managers.  In dealing with the differences between leadership and management; Valerie will cover the following areas at this webinar, which will help participants decide whether they are managers or leaders:

  • Lead by example
  • Recognize individual differences
  • Match people to jobs
  • Tailor rewards to individuals and link rewards directly to performance or goal
  • Check for fairness and equity among performers
  • Practice open communication
  • Allow for individual differences but recognize performance and achievement.

https://www.trainhr.com/control/leadership-development-trainings-program-best-practices

HR best practices

Like in every other field, there are best practices in HR, too. HR plays an important role in many of the organization’s decision making; hence, it is proper that there should be a set of HR best practices.

The foremost fact we have to bear in mind is that best practices are always subjective and prone to flux. Some practices may constitute best practices today, but could lose their relevance tomorrow. Or they could bounce back to the top of the list of best practices a day after tomorrow. HR best practices belong to this category. This is because most HR practices keep changing over time. Although they are relevant in the long run; the order of many HR best practices keeps varying over time.

So, when making a list of HR best practices, we have to admit that they are highly subjective and personal. There are no absolutes among HR best practices. A list for consideration:

Focus on the best quality recruitment

This appears like a no-brainer, corny best practice. But make no mistake: HR’s primary goal is to recruit the organization’s employees, who go on to become its lifeblood. So, when it comes to recruitment, HR should have the best tools for recruitment ready, and has to be very alert and efficient in making effective use of these. It should make sure that too much time is not wasted on looking out for candidates or on calling up the wrong ones. HR should be on its toes when it comes to the selection process. It should be nimble, smart and in complete alignment with management on the type of candidate it needs. It should further gauge the candidate’s temperament, attitude and outlook in quick time at the time of the interview. The best indicator of implementation of HR best practices is in how effectively and quickly HR fills up positions.

Creating and nurturing organizational culture

Next to recruiting, creating and nurturing organizational culture should be next in the list of HR best practices. HR’s thinking should be synchronous with the organization’s; as a result, the two should work harmoniously to create an organizational culture that unambiguously states what the organization is, and what employees should expect from it. Many globally recognized organizations are known as much for their products as for their culture. So, creating, preserving and growing organizational culture is one of the paramount HR best practices.

Enabling faster and complete automation

If HR has to move with the times and shed its beaten-to-death image of being the organization’s outdated laggard, it has to get a solid grip on automation. HR should take the initiative towards bringing about faster and effective automation. Today, software applications are available in the market for almost every bit of work that HR does. If it still chooses to stay behind and refuse to automate its day-to-day work; it will have only itself to blame for not keeping up with the times. The faster it moves ahead with automation, the greater the time it will have for its core functions. This should surely qualify for being among the important HR best practices.

 

References:

https://www.openforum.com/articles/10-best-practices-for-your-human-resources-department/

http://www.employwise.com/cafe-hr/hr-best-practices.html

http://hrdailyadvisor.blr.com/archive/2013/01/28/HR_Policies_Procedures_Masnagement_Best_Practices_2013.aspx

 

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