Ways for Transitioning into a New Role

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A role change is many times inevitable for individuals in many positions. Change, as we all know, is the only constant in a business. When this much is said about businesses, it is but natural that employees in various positions need to be prepared for a change in their role. In the current situation of most organizations today, employees cannot expect to keep performing fixed roles over a lifetime. A change in role can be brought about due to various circumstances. The organization may require it from the individual. Many times, it may be thrust on the individual without too much time to prepare for the transition.

In any case, just like how organizations that are prepared for change cope with it better; employees too, need to cultivate the attitude and mindset to anticipate a change in role. The more they are prepared, the greater the ease with which they will accept the new role, and the better they will perform once they have transitioned into the new role. On the other hand, if they are reluctant changers, they will feel that the role has been imposed on them. If they fail to live up to expectations, both they and the organization stand to suffer setbacks.

Organizations that anticipate and accept changes on their own and change because they want to, and not because they have to, are the ones that see change as an opportunity than as a punishment. The same applies to individuals too, that want to transition to a new role.

A training session on the ways of dealing with role change

What are the dynamics of transitioning to a new role in the organization? What kind of thinking does it require to successfully and smoothly transition to a new role in the organization? This is the core of the learning a webinar from TrainHR, a leading provider of professional trainings for the human resources industry, is going to impart.

The speaker at this webinar session is Valerie Pelan, President of Integrated Focus, who in the course of consulting and providing Executive coaching for over 10 years, has been providing her corporate clients with a strategic and global perspective that combines her business experience working in Fortune 100 companies and her experience as an entrepreneur. To enroll for this webinar and to benefit from Valerie’s suggestions and tips on how to successfully transition into a new role, please visit http://www.trainhr.com/control/w_product/~product_id=701728?wordpress-seo

This webinar has been approved for 1 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

All aspects of transitioning into a new role

This session is of immense value to personnel involved in the core thinking of organizations and those who are likely to be chosen for new positions at short notice. These include Leaders, Managers, Individual Contributors, High Potentials, and Baby Boomers.

At this session, Valerie will cover three important elements of transitioning to a new role and will discuss each in detail:

  • Adopt an inner winner mind-set
    • Characteristics of inner winners
    • Sharpening your emotional intelligence
    • Don’t step on your own toes
    • Take time to self-promote your brand
  • Assess the new position
    • What technical knowledge is needed?
    • Understand how it fits into the organizational structure and process flows
    • Meet key people
    • Promote your brand
  • Develop a 3 month and 6 month Plan
    • Uncover the “informal organization chart” and the road blocs
    • Identify your stakeholders
    • Align your “team” and build your strategy

Are you a leader or a manager?

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The debate about the differences between leadership and managerial ability is perhaps as old as the time these two qualities came to be identified. There is a lot of discussion about what leadership and management are, which of these is more suited for organizations, whether one of these is born and the other made, and so on.

Managers carry out the task assigned to them in an efficient, methodical manner. They go by the set processes and rules. A leader, on the other hand, leads by example. She is an intuitive person who thinks of out-of-the-box solutions to problems. She is rarely bound by the rules and lessons offered in management books.

This quote by Stephen Covey: “Effective leadership is putting first things first. Effective management is discipline, carrying it out”, sums up the difference between leadership and managerial abilities succinctly.

Further, few quotes about leadership and management perhaps give added perspectives on the differences between leadership and management:

  • You manage things; you lead people – Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper
  • People ask the difference between a leader and a boss. The leader leads, and the boss drives – Theodore Roosevelt
  • Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things – Peter Drucker
  • Management is efficiency in climbing the ladder of success; leadership determines whether the ladder is leaning against the right wall – Stephen R. Covey.

Despite the differences, an organization needs both

The differences between management and leadership are more pronounced when it comes to taking crucial decisions. A leader uses her intuition and takes decisions that are in the best interests of the organization and the people who get affected by the decision-making. A manager is important for carrying out the leader’s vision. In this sense, it is said that the role of the leader is strategic, while that of the manager is tactical.

Despite the numerous differences between the two qualities, both leadership and management are necessary and important for an organization. An organization needs both leadership and management if it has to carve out its path to success and progress. For the organization to be successful, both leadership and management have to collaborate and synergize. This blend is particularly useful in today’s global organizations, where the challenges are more varied and complex. There is a lot that is interesting to learn about the nature of the relationship and differences between leadership and management.

Lively learning session on leadership vs. management

So, for any organization, the point at which management and leadership converge and the extent to which they do so is very important. This is the topic of an interesting learning session from TrainHR, a highly popular provider of professional trainings for the human resources industry. At this webinar, Valerie Pelan, President of Integrated Focus, who provides her corporate clients with a strategic and global perspective that combines her business experience working in Fortune 100 companies and her experience as an entrepreneur, will be the speaker.

This session will take up the topic of leadership vs. management in depth. Valerie will explore the topic as it relates to organizations. To enroll for this highly absorbing session on leadership and management, please visit http://www.trainhr.com/control/w_product/~product_id=701696?wordpress-seo . This webinar has been approved for 1 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

Questions for judging leadership vs. management skills

At this session, Valerie will take up for discussion all the specific topics that enhance leaders and managers style, such as the following:

  • How consistent are you in your actions and decision-making processes?
  • What level of credibility do you hold in the context of your role?
  • How well do you use effective communication to build confidence and reassurance within your team?
  • People are attracted to leaders who “walk the talk”-are you that type of leader or manager?

This session is highly useful for professionals such as Managers, Leaders, HR Managers and Hiring Managers.  In dealing with the differences between leadership and management; Valerie will cover the following areas at this webinar, which will help participants decide whether they are managers or leaders:

  • Lead by example
  • Recognize individual differences
  • Match people to jobs
  • Tailor rewards to individuals and link rewards directly to performance or goal
  • Check for fairness and equity among performers
  • Practice open communication
  • Allow for individual differences but recognize performance and achievement.

https://www.trainhr.com/control/leadership-development-trainings-program-best-practices