Getting the Onboarding Right helps Organizations to keep Good Employees

onboarding

 

Onboarding is an extremely important function for an organization. It is the first step towards creating an impression about the organization in the mind of the new hire. Not getting the onboarding process right puts a stumbling block in the employee’s first step into the organization at the start of her employment. The onboarding process is the method by which the employee takes to the organization, which is why it has to be effective.

A common misconception in the minds of many people is that onboarding is the same as the employee orientation. Employee orientation is just the first step of onboarding. Orientation is about documentation and paperwork and presentations, because this is the session in which the employee gets to know about what the organization does in terms of its business, what it values are, what its position in the market is, and so on.

Onboarding, on the other hand, is an extension of orientation. It is the phase in which the employee gets to familiarize herself with the ways of the organization, the processes, the people, the benefits, and so on. More than anything else, the onboarding process is when the new hire gets to understand the organization’s culture, that most important intangible factor that eventually makes an employee stick to the employer or leave it and seek alternatives.

Period of adaption

It is during the onboarding phase that the new hire gets assimilated and integrated into the organization’s thinking. It lays the foundation to the behaviors expected of the new hire in her stint with the organization. Unlike orientation, which usually does not last more than a day; onboarding is carried out over a long period of time, usually three months, when the employee gets to adapt to the new organization.

This explains the importance of onboarding. This is why an onboarding program that goes wrong risks depriving the organization of good employees that could otherwise be assets of the future. Such an onboarding program is sure to create a less than favorable opinion with the new hire. When the first few weeks of the new employment appear boring and inept, how does one expect an employee to stay for the long haul?

Keeping the interest up is critical

The first signs of alienation emerge right then. Keeping the new employees idle without allocating responsibilities is sure to make them feel unwanted and bored. Feeding them with unnecessary information is another wasteful activity during an onboarding program.

An effective orientation program is one that should not only kick start the employee from day one at work; it should make her feel enthusiastic about doing so and create a feeling of belonging with the organization. It is actually more a process than a program.

Learning on how to get onboarding right

Business meeting

A webinar that is being organized by TrainHR, a leading provider of professional trainings for the human resources industry, will show how to create and implement an effective onboarding program. The speaker at this webinar is Judi Clements, President of Judi Clements Training & Development, in Clifton Park, NY, and a New York State certified teacher, trained mediator, and qualified Myers Briggs® Personality Type expert.

Please enroll for this webinar by visiting TrainHR . This webinar has been approved for 1 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

Helping to avoid common mistakes of onboarding

Judi will show the ways by which organizations can avoid the common mistakes of putting ineffective onboarding in place. She will help them to put not just a program, but a process that can be used for future times. She will show how to make employees productive from the very start of onboarding, which will make them enthusiastic and eager to work. She will help employees to prepare, conduct, and evaluate effective new employee orientation programs, update existing programs and to reflect new technologies and learning styles of 21st century employees.

Judi will cover the following areas at this webinar:

  • Avoid traditional orientation mistakes
  • Define onboarding goals
  • Plan an orientation agenda
  • Avoid information overload
  • Put new employees at ease
  • Ease the transition of new employees into existing teams
  • Develop rapport between new employees & their manager
  • Communicate organizational culture & support
  • Utilize new technologies
  • Provide consistency to ensure legal requirements
  • Increase new employee retention
  • Help HR professionals work with all levels of the organization to improve the onboarding experience.

 

Identifying and Retaining all the Stakeholders in a Business

An often overlooked aspect of a business is the stakeholders. Many organizations have a problem in identifying their real stakeholders. Many stakeholders are pretty obvious since they are visible. But many businesses have a problem in getting to understand who the real stakeholders are because there are the invisible ones who are difficult to identify.

Internal and external stakeholders make up a strong and potent force that has the ability to either make or break an organization. Often, the special benefits they provide are overlooked or ignored, leading to missed opportunities. Organizations stand to gain a lot from stakeholders through a stakeholder engagement process that helps to prevent problems. Proper planning needs to go into it, as it has to take the present situation and anticipate the future ones. The goal of this engagement process is to motivate other stakeholders to stay engaged too, which will be of immense use to the organization.

Identifying the real stakeholder is of utmost importance

Many a time, an organization could be short of its goal when it comes to recognizing the importance of the obvious and the abstruse stakeholder. It needs to understand if it omitted stakeholder from a key discussion or decision. It should also asses the loss caused to it by the stakeholder who causes it problems. These situations keep repeating often in corporate circles, leading to delays, bad feelings, or much more. The answer to this problem is to identify all the stakeholders and understand the role and importance each brings to the business. A wise business comes up with a plan to prevent a stakeholder from causing issues for the management.

Recognizing and retaining the right stakeholder involves more than just communication. Ideally, if the organization has to retain them, they have to do a lot, like:

  • Creating alliances with stakeholder leaders, which involves creating leaders where they don’t exist
  • Engaging with stakeholders by profiling their interests, opinions, values, risk tolerance, etc. and matching them with opportunities
  • Identifying what the organization may or may not negotiate with, and if it can be negotiated, the level and extent to which it can be done
  • Supporting and lauding and rewarding stakeholder efforts

These are some of the processes and actions an organization can take to derive the best out of its stakeholders.

Learn to understand the ways of identifying stakeholders and using them better

The ways of doing all this will be taught at a webinar that TrainHR, a leading provider of professional trainings for the human resources industry, will be organizing.

Jan Triplett, Ph.D., CEO of the internationally recognized Business Success Center, who is an entrepreneur, author, speaker and small business activist, will be the speaker at this webinar. She brings the experience of being a frequent keynote speaker on business growth models, funding and pricing strategies, alliance building, personnel management, and sales processes into this session.

To gain the knowledge of how to optimize the important resources of stakeholders and derive the best out of their experience and knowledge, please enroll for this webinar by visiting TrainHR

This webinar has been approved for 1 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

Everyone who wants to cultivate stakeholders and build up a fruitful relationship with them and make the best use of it, such as owners of businesses, top management staff (C- Level), Department Heads, Marketing & Sales Directors with inside or outside Sales Teams, Operations Manager, Vendors to larger Businesses and Non-profit Presidents or CEO’s will gain from this session.

At this hour-long session, Jan will cover the following areas:

  • Identifying and profiling all the relevant stakeholders and how to keep that current as plans and situations change
  • Creating a plan and process to communicate and work with stakeholders and other influencers who are relevant to stakeholders
  • Creating an early warning system to identify problems before they happen or grow
  • Implementing the Plan – timeline, expected results, budget management
  • Getting “buy in” for the plan from the top to the bottom of the organization and the stakeholders
  • Tracking and Evaluating the Plan
  • Adjusting the Plan
  • Celebrating success with stakeholders to encourage future participation and cooperation.

Understanding payroll fraud and preventing it

payroll_software1

 

Payroll fraud is a matter of serious concern to the people affected by it, the organization in which it happens, and to the economy overall. It is estimated that payroll fraud is involved in around an eighth of all workplace frauds and makes up about a twelfth of all occupational frauds worldwide. On average, a payroll fraud case results in loss of $ 48,000 and avoids detection for about three years. Each payroll case fraud costs around $ 72,000.

It is rather unfortunate, but expected that small organizations bear the brunt of payroll frauds. The reason for this is not far to seek: They usually lack the requisite fraud detection mechanisms, making them particularly susceptible to payroll fraud.

Common methods for preventing payroll fraud

Many organizations take a few steps to prevent payroll fraud. Some of these include limiting access to the information relating to payroll, engaging different people for different levels and areas of payroll functions so that it acts as some kind of checks and balances system, conducting thorough background checks of the employees in charge of payroll functions, checking ghost employee accounts, installing automated clearing house (ACH) filters, and a few others.

Section 404 of SOX Act

Additionally, the Sarbanes Oxley Act, which was a landmark legislation aimed at putting checks on large corporate frauds, also requires companies to take a few steps to prevent payroll fraud. Section 404 of the SOX Act requires a few stringent steps:

  • Companies have to include an Internal Control Report in their annual financial reports stating that the management takes responsibility for implementing what SOX terms an “adequate” internal control structure
  • Management has to assess the effectiveness of this internal control structure
  • Deficiencies and discrepancies in these controls must be reported
  • These declarations by the management have to be attested by external registered auditors.

A complete discussion of the ways of preventing payroll fraud

A thorough understanding of all the elements of payroll fraud and the ways of preventing them will be discussed at a webinar that is being organized by TrainHR, a leading provider of professional trainings for the human resources industry. At this webinar, Dayna Reum, who is Payroll Tax Manager at PetSmart Inc. and has been heavily involved in the payroll field over 15 years; will be the speaker.

To get an in-depth idea of payroll fraud and to understand the ways of dealing with it, please register for this webinar by visiting TrainHR

Tools for detecting payroll fraud

The purpose of this session is to help participants gain an understanding of the legal rules around detecting and deferring payroll fraud. Dayna will review tools that companies can use to detect or deter fraud with immediate effect. She will take up Section 404 of the SOX Act for detailed discussion and examine the requirements in it that publicly traded companies have to meet. She will also explain how the provisions of the Act are designed to check payroll fraud.

This webinar will be of high value to professionals involved in payroll functions, such as Payroll Professionals, Compensation Professionals, HR Professionals, and Benefit Professionals. In the course of this webinar, Dayna will cover the following areas:

  • Payroll Fraud Statistic’s-How big of a problem is it?
  • How does payroll fraud occur?
  • Preventing Payroll Fraud
  • Internal Controls
  • Tools (Process Maps, Business Continuity Plans, Process Documentation)
  • Audits
  • Sarbanes-Oxley 404 Requirements
  • Ethical Business Practices.

Behavior based interviewing for selecting the right candidate

oracle-dba-hr-interview

Many organizations make the mistake of basing the suitability of candidates purely on their skills and the knowledge they bring. This measure goes only half the way, and is incomplete, because many organizations fail to take into consideration the fact that behavior is a stronger and more reliable indicator of the person’s suitability to the organization than just academic qualification or skills.

Behavior indicates the cultural fit of the candidate more than these other criteria and even experience. It is an often overlooked parameter for judging the suitability of candidates, but this is more important than the other criteria mentioned here because many candidates appear very well qualified and skilled, but have gaps in their behavior.

Behavioral mismatch is a serious error

Candidates with a behavioral mismatch are more likely to leave the organization or create problems for it than others. They are most likely to get fired, because they are not able to bring or reflect the organization’s thinking in their work.

Attitudes and behaviors are more vital to perform at a higher level consistently than just skills and experience, which most candidates more or less gain over time anyway. Candidates with unsuited behaviors are likely to cost organizations millions of dollars. Yet, many organizations overlook this important aspect of selection.

Asking the right questions is the key

Hiring the candidate with the right behavior involves assessing them with relation to a set of behavioral patterns and predicting their response to it in real life situations. This will help the organization gauge the suitability of candidates from the behavioral perspective.

This involves framing and asking the right behavior-based questions and evaluating the responses. Of course, doing this accurately is important, because if the behavioral test is not framed rightly or is not implemented properly; it can misfire and can lead to a less than thorough or incomplete assessment, making the whole exercise futile.

Learn the ways of assessing candidate behavior

How do organizations get this right? How do they frame the right behavior-based questions that lead them to measure the candidate in the right way? This is the learning a webinar from TrainHR, a leading provider of professional trainings for the human resources industry, will be providing.

Grant Schneider, president and founder of Performance Development Strategies, which helps organizations achieve greater results by aligning people in the organization with the organization’s mission and strategy, will be the speaker at this session. This webinar has been approved for 1 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

To get a proper understanding of the ways by which your organization can implement the strategies needed for framing the perceptive questions needed to point to behavioral attitudes, please enroll for this session by visiting TrainHR. Grant will help participants understand the ways by which they can avoid costly errors in the future by hiring candidates without the right behavior sets needed for being the right fit.

Everyone involved directly or indirectly in hiring and dealing with its effects on the organization, such as HR Professionals, CEO, Senior Vice President, Vice President, Executive Directors, Managing Directors, Regional Vice President, Area Supervisors and Managers will gain important insights into this topic.

Grant will cover the following areas at this webinar:

  • How to create and ask open-ended questions
  • How to solicit examples of past behavior to predict future behavior
  • How to take useful interview notes
  • How to get beyond the rehearsed answers to find out what a candidate is really thinking
  • How to establish interview evaluation criteria
  • How to identify and evaluate skills objectively.

Ways of understanding and eradicating bullying

 

workplace-bullying-signs

There is no gainsaying the fact that bullying at the workplace is a very harsh and wicked way of degrading a colleague. It is a very uncivilized form of harassment at the workplace and is a serious deterrent to a healthy relationship at the professional level. Workplace bullying is very abusive by nature. Those at the receiving end of workplace bullying are subject to mental torture that is very humiliating.

Some of the behaviors that are considered bullying at the workplace include:

  • Yelling at a colleague
  • Manipulating their work
  • Sending nasty emails
  • Targeting them and isolating them socially

What are the ways in which employees subjected to workplace bullying suffer?

Bullying, like abuse, causes deep psychological effects on the victim:

  • Workplace bullying lowers the self-esteem of the victim
  • It causes anxiety at work
  • Employees who are subject to workplace bullying have higher degrees of burnout and depression
  • They are certain to experience a highly lowered level of job satisfaction.

If allowed to continue unchecked, workplace bullying can cause several difficult situations. These are some of them:

  • Victims of workplace bullying are likely to look for reasons to leave their job
  • They are likely to be less efficient at work than other normal employees
  • Workplace bullying results in conflict and misunderstanding and unhappiness in the victims’ family lives
  • Victims of workplace bullying offer poor customer service
  • In an organization in which there is rampant bullying, the workplace becomes unhealthy and vitiated.

Explore bullying and ways of containing it

Want to understand workplace bullying, so that you can take the right steps to help your organization overcome its fallouts? Then, you need to attend a webinar from TrainHR, a leading provider of professional trainings for the human resources industry. At this webinar, Catherine M. Mattice, who is President of consulting and training firm, Civility Partners, LLC, and has been successfully providing programs in workplace bullying and building positive workplaces since 2007; will be the speaker.

This webinar has been approved for 1.5 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

To get a complete understanding of what bullying is and to implement ways of identifying and controlling it; please enroll for this webinar by visiting TrainHR

A complete discussion on all aspects of workplace bullying

Catherine will start with giving an understanding of workplace bullying. She will teach strategies that can be adapted to implement a corporate policy that meets employees’ expectations and gets their buy-in. The ways of empowering employees, supervisors and managers to prevent bullying will be explained. She will offer a wide perspective on regulatory updates on workplace bullying.

During the course of this 90-minute session, Catherine will offer research-based information on the core areas of workplace bullying, which include a definition of workplace bullying. She will offer these and give suitable examples. She will then take up the social system of bullying and describe the damage caused to targets, bystanders, and the organization with workplace bullying.

Corrective measures

Catherine will then move on to making a business case for addressing bullying to organizational leaders and suggest corrective action items to end bullying. She will also explain what kind of preventative action items and sustainable culture change can be taken and then explain regulatory updates and offer information about where bullying has already been made illegal.

This session is highly relevant and useful to those in charge of employee affairs in an organization, such as HR professionals, Business consultants, EAPs (Employee Assistance Programs), Labor relations, Unions, Leaders, Directors, Managers and Supervisors, and business owners.

She will cover the following areas at this webinar:

  • The definition of workplace bullying
  • Examples of bullying behaviors
  • The social system of workplace bullying
  • Damage caused to targets and the organization
  • Making a business case to the c-suite for ending bullying
  • Implementing a corporate policy that gets buy in from employees
  • Leaning on your core values to put a stop to bullying behavior
  • Empowering employees, supervisors and managers to stop bullying
  • Creating a strategic plan around ending bullying
  • Conducting effective employee and manager training that will provide the right skills
  • Regulatory updates on workplace bullying.

5 attributes for employee assistance program

An Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is a program that an organization implements to ease some of the personal problems faced by its employees. An employee assistance program is largely voluntary, in that it is not mandatory either for organizations to implement it, or for very employee to avail it.

employee assistance program - TrainHR

According to the Employee Assistance Professionals Association, here’s what to look for:

  1. 24/7 phone response. Seek out providers that have trained counselors on duty answering a toll-free phone line at all times. Avoid EAPs that require users to navigate an elaborate phone tree before reaching a counselor.
  2. Confidential services. Licensed, professional counselors should deliver assessments and face-to-face counseling sessions in safe, private and confidential offices. Make sure there are enough counselors in your area to deliver timely services in both urgent and nonurgent cases.
  3. Referral support and follow-up. The EAP should assist employees by providing referrals for long-term or specialized care based on assessed needs, recommended treatment and employees’ financial resources. The EAP should provide follow-up and ongoing support for employees.
  4. Crisis intervention. Will EAP counselors come to your facility if there’s an emergency, such as an incident of workplace violence? Good EAPs can provide counseling for traumatized employees. They can also help management coordinate emergency-response plans.
  5. Substance abuse expertise. Given their disproportionately great impact on the workplace, drug and alcohol abuse problems often represent the bulk of EAP cases.

Broad provisions of the National Labor Relations Act

One of the landmark legislations pertaining to labor relations in US history; the National Labor Relations Act was passed by the American Congress as far back as in 1935. It was one of the most prominent Acts passed during Franklin Roosevelt’s presidency.  Since it was New York senator Robert Wagner who was instrumental in formulating and promulgating this piece of legislation, it is sometimes also referred eponymously as the Wagner Act.

The highpoints

The outstanding features of this statute are: it

a)     gives private sector employees to organize themselves into trade unions;

b)     gives them the right to engage in collective bargaining to secure better working conditions and other employment terms;

c)      guarantees improved conditions at work, and

d)     gives them the right to take some forms of collective action, which can include the right to strike work if they think it as being necessary.

 

While these points form the nucleus of this statute; the National Labor Relations Act also made way for the creation of the National Labor Relations Board. This board is given oversight of conduct of elections to unions and other employee-oriented bodies.

When members are voted to important positions of this board; the National Labor Relations Act hands labor unions the status of sole representatives of workers. This is the only legal representation of workers, and is the only body with which the employer has to engage on matters concerning collective bargaining.

Who are exempt?

While National Labor Relations Act brings under its panoply virtually all kinds of employees and workers in the private sector; there are some types of employees who are exempt from its provisions. These include:

a)     employees who come under the Railway Labor Act;

b)     those who do domestic work; those engaged in agriculture (those who work for agriculturists);

c)      independent contractors;

d)     those who work for the government at any level –local, State or federal, and

e)     some kinds of close relatives of employees.

References:

http://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/national_labor_relations_act_nlra

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Labor_Relations_Act

 

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