employment law, Human Resources Training, Law & Compliance

A glimpse at the Employment Law in the US

Almost all aspects of employment are covered by Employment Laws in the US. Employment law in the US primarily concerns the relationship of rights and duties between workers and employers. Whenever these laws are impinged upon, the aggrieved party has the right to go to court.

Employment law in the US is a very broad and huge body of laws. The US Congress enacted these laws from time to time with these intents:

  • Ending discrimination in employment
  • Fostering collective bargaining by workers
  • Helping workers get unemployment compensation
  • Building safety into the workplace
  • Helping put pension plans in place
  • Fixing numbers and making laws for worker pay

A look at some of the employment laws in the US

Nearly 200 employment laws in the US are governed by the Department of Labor (DoL). A look at some of the important ones among these:

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA):

A major employment law in the US; the FLSA sets minimum wages and overtime pay for people who work in both the private and public sector. It has rules on payment: a minimum of $ 7.25 per hour and overtime of one and a half times the fixed wage for those who work for more than 40 hours a week. This Act also prohibits the employment of persons below the age of 16 and puts restrictions on employing those below 18 in certain categories of employment. The Wage and Hour Division of the FLSA also has labor standards under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), which apply to aliens that are authorized to work in the U.S.

 

Read more :  https://www.trainhr.com/control/employment-law

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employment law, Human Resources Training, Law & Compliance

A brief understanding of The National Labor Relations Act

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The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) is a pivotal workforce-related legislation of the US. Legislated way back in 1935, The National Labor Relations Act gives rights to employees in the private sector to form unions and work together for collective bargaining with employers seeking enhanced working conditions or pay. The National Labor Relations Act also gives employees the right to go on strike if necessary, subject to certain conditions.

Regulation of employee union behavior

The National Labor Relations Act was considered radical for its time not only for propagating its main intent relating to the labor force; it was considered a signal legislation also because it had a provision by which the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) could be created. The NLRB allows for the conduct of elections by which office bearers of employee labor unions who engage in collective bargaining on behalf of the employees with the employers get elected.

Pillars of The National Labor Relations Act

The National Labor Relations Act is built on two pillars: Collective bargaining and unfair labor practices. These functions also constitute the central nature of work of The National Labor Relations Act.

a. Employee collective bargaining power

The core of The National Labor Relations Act is the elimination of the difference in bargaining powers between employees employed in the organized, professional cadre who have freedom of expression to vent their grievances with their employees and those who are employed in sectors that do not have these features.

Taking into consideration the fact of the lack of freedom of expression for employees in the unorganized sector; The National Labor Relations Act strengthened the power of labor in this sector to organize collective bargaining between the workforce and the employers, as well as trade unions.

b. Unfair labor practices

The National Labor Relations Act has elaborate descriptions of what constitutes unfair labor practices and puts in place mechanisms to remedy them. Broadly, unfair labor practices relate to discrimination, offering of low pay, preventing the employee the freedom to work by harassing or interfering or trying to deny an employee membership of a trade union.

read more :   https://www.trainhr.com/control/national-labor-relations-act

employment law, Human Resources Training

A glimpse at the Employment Law in the US

 

Family Law Book

Almost all aspects of employment are covered by Employment Laws in the US. Employment law in the US primarily concerns the relationship of rights and duties between workers and employers. Whenever these laws are impinged upon, the aggrieved party has the right to go to court.

Employment law in the US is a very broad and huge body of laws. The US Congress enacted these laws from time to time with these intents:

  • Ending discrimination in employment
  • Fostering collective bargaining by workers
  • Helping workers get unemployment compensation
  • Building safety into the workplace
  • Helping put pension plans in place
  • Fixing numbers and making laws for worker pay

A look at some of the employment laws in the US

Nearly 200 employment laws in the US are governed by the Department of Labor (DoL). A look at some of the important ones among these:

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA):

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A major employment law in the US; the FLSA sets minimum wages and overtime pay for people who work in both the private and public sector. It has rules on payment: a minimum of $ 7.25 per hour and overtime of one and a half times the fixed wage for those who work for more than 40 hours a week. This Act also prohibits the employment of persons below the age of 16 and puts restrictions on employing those below 18 in certain categories of employment. The Wage and Hour Division of the FLSA also has labor standards under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), which apply to aliens that are authorized to work in the U.S.

 

The Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act

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OSHA, a program concerning employment law in the US, is aimed at ensuring safety at the workplace. OSHA sets out a number of regulations and standards that employers in various industries have to implement in order to see to it that the workplace is free of hazards.

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA)

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ERISA is directed towards employers that have welfare or pension benefit plans for their employees. ERISA, an employment law in the US that comes under the Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA), sets out a huge variety of reporting requirements relating to the disclosing, reporting and fiduciary aspects of employee benefits.

Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

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Under the FMLA, employers for whom at least 50 employees work are required to grant eligible employees leave of up to 12 weeks to meet certain family situations or emergencies. These could be childbirth or serious illness of the employee, child, parent or spouse. Although this leave is unpaid, the FMLA protects employees from being fired for taking this benefit and thus qualifies as a major employment law in the US.

 

Read more :  https://www.trainhr.com/control/employment-law