5 attributes for employee assistance program

An Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is a program that an organization implements to ease some of the personal problems faced by its employees. An employee assistance program is largely voluntary, in that it is not mandatory either for organizations to implement it, or for very employee to avail it.

employee assistance program - TrainHR

According to the Employee Assistance Professionals Association, here’s what to look for:

  1. 24/7 phone response. Seek out providers that have trained counselors on duty answering a toll-free phone line at all times. Avoid EAPs that require users to navigate an elaborate phone tree before reaching a counselor.
  2. Confidential services. Licensed, professional counselors should deliver assessments and face-to-face counseling sessions in safe, private and confidential offices. Make sure there are enough counselors in your area to deliver timely services in both urgent and nonurgent cases.
  3. Referral support and follow-up. The EAP should assist employees by providing referrals for long-term or specialized care based on assessed needs, recommended treatment and employees’ financial resources. The EAP should provide follow-up and ongoing support for employees.
  4. Crisis intervention. Will EAP counselors come to your facility if there’s an emergency, such as an incident of workplace violence? Good EAPs can provide counseling for traumatized employees. They can also help management coordinate emergency-response plans.
  5. Substance abuse expertise. Given their disproportionately great impact on the workplace, drug and alcohol abuse problems often represent the bulk of EAP cases.

Bullying at the workplace has to be countered holistically

Bullying at the workplace is a serious issue that can have major consequences for employees and the organization. HR has to nip it in the bud before it spirals out of control.

Very quickly, bullying includes all or any of these:

  • swearing at other employees
  • harassing
  • humiliating
  • threatening
  • abusing
  • interfering in another colleague’s work,
  • Intimidating, and the like.

Bullying at the workplace, like violence, is a fact of life. At differing levels, it is prevalent almost globally. Having said this, it is not apt for HR to accept this fact and go on with life. HR has a major responsibility of ensuring that workplace bullying has to be dealt with effectively.

Dealing with a global phenomenon

On most occasions, bullying is very discreet. The bully and the bullied both know it is there, but is very difficult to prove or pin down some actions to. Worse, the bully is on many occasions the boss, which means no one has the courage to take the bully on. Yet, there are some ways by which HR can initiate action against workplace bullying:

bullying at the workplace

bullying at the workplace

Workplace bullying can flare out and become an all-consuming inferno if it is not contained properly. You could gain more info on how to tackle bullying at the workplace here (http://www.trainhr.com/control/bullying-at-workplace)