employee performance evaluation, Human Resources Training

Performance Reviews that Build Loyalty

Performancereviews

One of the most vital aspects of an employer-employee relationship is the performance review. This exercise is meant to help the organization assess the employee’s performance during a period of time in the light of the organization’s expectations and the employee’s fulfillment of the same.

However, most performance reviews end up being less than successful and result in a situation where neither party is satisfied, because, even though done sincerely, most performance reviews are carried out with the wrong focus. Rather than being open and honest conversations, most performance reviews end up telling the employee where all she needs to improve and pointing fingers at why she did not deliver up to expectations.

What then, are the components that ensure that the performance review is a robust one in which there is proper alignment of both the organization’s expectations and the employee performance?

These issues will be taken up for sharp analysis at a webinar that TrainHR, a leading provider of professional training for the human resources areas, will be organizing on July 31. Karla Brandau, the CEO of Workplace Power Institute, will be the expert at this session. Please enroll for this valuable learning session by visiting https://www.trainhr.com/webinar/performance-reviews-that-build-loyalty–702462LIVE.

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The essence of the learning this webinar is going to impart is an understanding of how to use performance reviews as the basis for ensuring professional growth in the employee by bringing the employee’s performance and the organization’s goal together, which will benefit both parties.

Both sides should set realistic and achievable goals. The organization should ensure that the hindrances that the employee faces in achieving these goals are removed, and should create a conducive environment for the employee to accomplish these goals. Feedback and questions, both positive and negative, should become an integral part of this exercise, and should be encouraged.

The objective of a positive performance review is that it should create goodwill and a sense of bonhomie between the two. It should evolve into a system that, when put in place, becomes the basis for such an exercise throughout the year. At this webinar, the speaker will show how participants can:

  • Assess their skill at clearly stating expectations
  • Set consequences for non-performance
  • Handle inadvertent human errors
  • Use a conversational interview format
  • Speak from observable facts
  • Give feedback that builds the relationship
  • Work with criticism
  • Develop KRA’s – Key Result Areas

She will offer tips on how to logically document performance, set up an appropriate environment for conversations, and invite the employee and set up the performance review meeting. She will cover the following areas at this webinar, which will help the stakeholders in a performance review, such as Senior Managers in all departments, mid-Managers at all levels in the organization, Supervisors, Team Leaders, Project Managers, or just anyone tasked to give performance reviews immensely:

  • Planning ahead for Performance Reviews
  • Personal preparation for the one-on-one Performance review Conversation
  • Preparing the employee for the Performance Review
  • Determining KRAs for the coming year
  • Creating rapport with the Employee

A bonus for those attending this webinar is the teaching the speaker will give of how to use expanded Microsoft Outlook Calendar and Task Folder features to keep on top of performance review content and meeting times with employees.

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About the speaker: Karla is a thought leader in management and team building techniques. A specialist in personalities, communication skills, and leadership principles, she has authored the book, How to Earn the Gift of Discretionary Effort, which aims to teach managers how to be the leader people CHOOSE to follow, not have to follow because of their position on the organizational chart.

 

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